There was an error in this gadget

Monday, March 30, 2009

Stats day for the BOE...

Sectoral breakdown of aggregate M4 and M4 lending February 2009 and Lending to Individuals February 2009, were released today.

The reports speak for themselves.

M4 snipits...
The household sector’s holdings of M4 rose by £3.3 billion in February. The annual growth rate continued to fall, to 4.2%. M4 lending (excluding the effects of securitisations etc) to the household sector rose by £2.5 billion. The annual growth rate fell further, to 4.3%. Private non-financial corporations’ (PNFCs’) holdings of M4 rose by £6.5 billion; the annual growth rate was less negative, at -2.1%. M4 lending (excluding the effects of securitisations etc) to PNFCs rose by £2.9 billion in February and annual growth fell, to 3.6%. Holdings of M4 by other financial corporations (OFCs) rose by £18.4 billion and M4 lending (excluding the effects of securitisations etc) to OFCs rose by £22.4 billion in February

and... net lending snipits.

The increase in total net lending to individuals in February (£1.3 billion) was higher than the January increase, but below the previous six-month average (Table A). The twelve-month growth rate continued to fall, by 0.5 percentage points to 2.6%, and the three-month annualised growth rate was unchanged at 1.3%...

Consumer credit declined by a net £0.2 billion, weaker than the £0.2 billion net increase in January and below the previous six‑month average (Table A). Net credit card lending increased by £0.2 billion and net other loans and advances fell by £0.4 billion. The annual growth rate of consumer credit continued to fall, to 3.4%; the three-month annualised growth rate fell by 1.5 percentage points, to 0.1%.


I had to be lazy to just quote the information in the table. You can link to it to get the rest of the information. Pretty straight forward stuff.

My thing is now, seeing that net-lending is somehwat up and M$ has increased, but GDP is still shrinking, perhaps people are saving more in addition to buying smaller quantities?

Lending isn't pentrating the market by many analysts figures. So, are we in for a permanent contraction of leading consumption in industrialized economies? Is this more than just figures and the signs of a long term fad/trend?
Post a Comment